Join Silvermoon LaRose of the Tomaquag Museum for an engaging discussion of Firekeeper’s Daughter. Although this literary work focuses on the Anishinaabe communities of the Great Lakes, the copious cultural nuances described in the book are relatable to Indigenous communities far and wide. Together we will explore this exciting publication and the relevance to the Indigenous communities of Southern New England that makes Firekeeper's Daughter meaningful to so many.

Silvermoon Mars LaRose, a member of the Narragansett Tribe, is the assistant director of the Tomaquag Museum in Rhode Island. She assists the museum's executive director with managing the museum’s collections and archives, cultural education, and the Indigenous Empowerment projects. Silvermoon has worked in tribal communities for more than 20 years, serving in the areas of health and human services and education. Throughout her career, Silvermoon has had the opportunity to travel extensively, learning from Indigenous communities throughout the United States. Silvermoon is also a member of the Rhode Island Foundation’s inaugural cohort of the Equity Leadership Initiative.

As a public servant, Silvermoon serves as the secretary for the Charlestown Conservation Commission. As an artist and educator, she hopes to foster Indigenous empowerment through education, community building, and the sharing of cultural knowledge and traditional arts. She holds a Bachelor of Arts in Sociology, with a minor in Justice Law and Society, from the University of Rhode Island, and a partially completed Masters in Rehabilitation Counseling from Western Washington University.

Registration is strongly suggested for this event. CLICK HERE to register to attend in person.

 

More Resources...

Celebrate Native American Culture
Firekeeper's Daughter Read Alikes
Local Indigenous Peoples

 

 

Ken Burns' new three-part documentary, The U.S. and the Holocaust, directed and produced by Burns, Lynn Novick and Sarah Botstein, explores America’s response to the horrors of the Holocaust and the rise of authoritarianism in Europe. Join us for a brief screening and panel discussion moderated by CPTV host Ray Hardman, tracing the parallels between the decline of democracy leading up to World War II and the current threat to democracy today.

IF YOU MISSED THE PROGRAM, YOU MAY VIEW THE RECORDING HERE

The U.S. and the Holocaust, delves into America’s response to one of the greatest humanitarian crises of the 20th century. Inspired in part by the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum’s “Americans and the Holocaust” exhibition and supported by its historical resources, the film examines the rise of Hitler and Nazism in Germany in the context of global antisemitism and racism, the eugenics movement in the United States and race laws in the American south. The series, written by Geoffrey Ward, sheds light on what the U.S. government and American people knew and did as the catastrophe unfolded in Europe.

Combining the first-person accounts of Holocaust witnesses and survivors and interviews with leading historians and writers, The U.S. and the Holocaust dispels competing myths that Americans either were ignorant of the unspeakable persecution that Jews and other targeted minorities faced in Europe or that they looked on with callous indifference. The film tackles a range of questions that remain essential to our society today, including how racism influences policies related to immigration and refugees as well as how governments and people respond to the rise of authoritarian states that manipulate history and facts to consolidate power.

Ray Hardman is Connecticut Public’s Arts and Culture Reporter. He is the host of CPTV’s Emmy-nominated original series “Where Art Thou?” Ray was also the local voice of “Morning Edition” for 12 years on Connecticut Public Radio, and later served as the host of “All Things Considered.” Ray started his career at WFSU Radio in Tallahassee, Florida while pursuing a Master’s Degree in Opera Performance. He now lives in West Hartford with his wife Kathleen, his two teenage boys, and Charlie, the naughty Black Lab

Sarah Botstein is one of the filmmakers of Florentine Films and has for more than two decades produced some of the most popular and acclaimed documentaries on PBS. Her work with directors Ken Burns and Lynn Novick, includes Hemingway (2020), College Behind Bars (2010), The Vietnam War (2017), Prohibition (2011), The War (2007) and Jazz (2001). Currently, she is producing an epic six-part 12- hour series on the American Revolution and a project on Lyndon Johnson’s life andpresidency. In addition to the television broadcasts, Botstein works on digital and education initiatives, in collaboration with PBS Learning Media and WETA-TV. She helps to oversee content for Ken Burns UNUM, a web-based platform and mini series which utilizes scenes from Florentine Films body of work to highlight historical themes relevant to our time.

Dr. Glenn Dynner is the Carl and Dorothy Bennett Professor of Judaic Studies and Director of the Bennett Center at Fairfield University. Since 2014, Dynner has served as professor of Religion and chair of the Religion Department at Sarah Lawrence College. He received his BA with honors in Comparative History from Brandeis University, an MA with honors from McGill University in Jewish Studies, and his PhD from Brandeis University in the Department of Near Eastern and Judaic Studies in 2002. Dynner is the author of two acclaimed books published by Oxford University Press: Men of Silk: The Hasidic Conquest of Polish Jewish Society (2006), winner of the Koret Publication Prize and a National Jewish Book Award Finalist, and Yankel’s Tavern: Jews, Liquor, & Life in the Kingdom of Poland (2013), which received honorable mention for the 2013 Jordan Schnitzer Book Award. The author of numerous journal articles and essays in edited volumes, he is currently working on a book titled The Light of Learning: The Hasidic Revival in Poland on the Eve of the Holocaust. Recipient of a prestigious Guggenheim Fellowship in 2019-20, he was associate editor of the journal Jewish History from 2016-18 and currently serves as co-editor of Shofar: A Journal of Interdisciplinary Jewish Studies. Dynner is a member of the Scholarly Advisory Board of the YIVO Institute and is the YIVO representative on the Center for Jewish History’s Academic Advisory Council. He is a member of The Academic Advisory Board of the Yale Fortunoff Archive and serves on the editorial boards of POLIN and East European Jewish Affairs.

Chris Vials is an Associate Professor of English at the University of Connecticut-Storrs, where he is also the Director of American Studies. His broader research interests include class and racial formation, popular culture, ethnic studies, social movements (left and right) and working class cultural studies. Most of his work thus far has focused on class, race, and social movements in the 20th century United States. Since 2012, much of his work has been on antifascism and American fascist movements.  His second monograph, titled Haunted by Hitler: Liberals, the Left, and the Fight against Fascism in the United States (Massachusetts, 2014) traces the history of antifascist politics in the United States since the 1930s. He is also the editor of American Literature in Transition: 1940-1950 (Cambridge, 2017), and is the co-editor of  The U.S. Antifascism Reader with Bill Mullen (Verso, 2020). He has appeared on PBS, NPR, and CBC radio to discuss manifestations of fascism in the United States.

Community Partners: Jewish Federation of Greater Fairfield County, Connecticut Public Television

Pages Through the Ages is a book discussion group hosted jointly by the Westport Museum for History and Culture and the Library. Discuss Bill Bryson's One Summer: America, 1927 with Bruce McGuirk and other history buffs. Meetings will alternate between the buildings, so please check the venue prior to attending!

The summer of 1927 began with Charles Lindbergh crossing the Atlantic. Meanwhile, Babe Ruth was closing in on the home run record. In Newark, New Jersey, Alvin “Shipwreck” Kelly sat atop a flagpole for twelve days, and in Chicago, the gangster Al Capone was tightening his grip on bootlegging. The first true “talking picture,” Al Jolson’s The Jazz Singer, was filmed, forever changing the motion picture industry. One Summer transforms it all into narrative nonfiction of the highest order.   Read the New York Times Review. 

Registration suggested. If you wish to join via Zoom, please register here. 

Copies of the book are available at the Westport Library.

Community Partner: Westport Museum for History & Culture

 


History
Biography & Memoir

 

Discuss Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee with Bruce McGuirk and other history buffs at Pages Through the Ages. Read the classic native American history by Dee Brown or watch the film version.

Using council records, autobiographies, and firsthand descriptions, Brown allows the great chiefs and warriors of the Dakota, Ute, Sioux, Cheyenne, and other tribes to tell us in their own words of the battles, massacres, and broken treaties that finally left them demoralized and defeated. A unique and disturbing narrative told with force and clarity, Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee changed forever our vision of how the West was really won.

Copies of the book are available at the Westport Library. This meeting will be virtual, so please register.

Community Partner: Westport Museum for History & Culture

 

 

 

 

Wounded Knee Massacre

Native American Heritage Month

Celebrate Native American Culture

 

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