Authors Drew Pendergrass and Troy Vettese will discuss their radical plan to address climate disaster and their book, Half-Earth Socialism with Kevin Gallagher, host of WPKN's "Digging in the Dirt."

Rather than allow the forces of the free market to destroy the planet, we must strive for a post-capitalist society able to guarantee the good life the entire planet. This plan includes:
• rewild half the Earth to absorb carbon emissions and restore biodiversity
• pursue a rapid transition to renewable energy, paired with drastic cuts in consumption by the world’s wealthiest populations
• enact global veganism to cut down on energy and land use
• inaugurate worldwide socialist planning to efficiently and equitably manage production
• welcome the participation of everyone—even you!

This is a virtual program, please register. Copies of the book are available for purchase.

Drew Pendergrass is a PhD student in Environmental Engineering at Harvard University. His current research uses satellite, aircraft and surface observations of the environment to correct supercomputer models of the atmosphere. His environmental writing has been published in Harper’s, the GuardianJacobin, and Current Affairs.

Troy Vettese is an environmental historian and a Max Weber fellow at the European University Institute, where he is affiliated with the Robert Schuman Centre for Advanced Studies. He studies the history of environmental economics, energy, and animal life under capitalism. His writing has appeared in BookforumNew Left ReviewThe Guardiann+1 and many more publications.

Kevin Gallagher is a documentary producer & videographer for Audio/Video independent productions and legal video work. Kevin has held many positions at WPKN: Program Director, Fundraising Director and Benefits Director and most recently Long Island Director. Kevin loves live music, our ecology, progressive politics, gourmet cooking, good red wine, detective novels, John Garfield movies and gardening. “Digging In The Dirt” is a ½ hour interview program where Kevin and his guests dig a little deeper into issues surrounding climate change, the environment, farming, gardening and food.

Dinner Distrupted is a series created in partnership with libraries in Fairfield and New Haven County engaging patrons in collective discussions and actions focused on engaging residents to play a more active role in their food system. Imagine a future where the public grounds are a food forests, adding biodiversity to the landscape, which ultimately helps to improve air quality, regenerate the soil, aids with water conservation, and increases public health and wellbeing. Food security is defined as the state of having reliable access to a sufficient quantity of affordable, nutritious foods. What affects food security is policy, zoning, land use, and increasingly, climate change.


Climate Change
Living a Clean Life
Open Spaces

What is a food desert? What is food apartheid? How does access or lack of access to fresh and nutritious foods affect a community? Ife Kilimanjaro, Ph.D. and Co-Executive Director of Soul Fire Farm and Melissa Spiesman of Food Rescue US will discuss historical practices that have led to our current food systems and how local communities can help to change the system by working with and for their neighbors. Understanding historical policies and practices is a great step in creating space for a new conversation regarding food security and a healthy future for all.

This is a virtual event, please register.

Ife Kilimanjaro, Ph.D., Co-Executive Director / Managing Director (she/her) of Soul Fire Farm, is a grandmother, author, researcher, educator, activist, traditional healer and spirit warrior whose life and work are informed by her deep commitment to healing, justice and co-creating a better world. A sociologist and organizer, prior to Soul Fire Farm, Ife Kilimanjaro served as the senior network engagement director at the U.S. Climate Action Network. She was spurred to work on environmental issues after working as an elementary school principal in Detroit, where she saw children get sick and miss school because of air pollution and lack of access to clean water.

Melissa Spiesman, Chief Operating Officer of Food Rescue US has over 25 years as a hospitality and nutrition professional and has combined this experience with her passion for ending hunger and food waste to help develop innovative food recovery solutions. In 2011, Melissa joined Food Rescue US, then known as Community Plates, and now serves as their VP, National Site Director. She has helped to expand the organization nationally. Melissa supports each individual location in their day to day operations and helps them develop strategic partnerships to increase their impact on the communities they serve. With a goal of expanding to all 50 states over the next 3-5 years, she meets with individuals and organizations daily to launch new Food Rescue US affiliates.

Dinner Disrupted is a series created in partnership with libraries in Fairfield and New Haven County engaging patrons in collective discussions and actions focused on engaging residents to play a more active role in their food system. Together, we can reimagine our landscape and use the library as a test ground for reincorporating food into our landscape. Imagine a future where the public grounds are a food forests, adding biodiversity to the landscape, which ultimately helps to improve air quality, regenerate the soil, aids with water conservation, and increases public health and wellbeing. Food security is defined as the state of having reliable access to a sufficient quantity of affordable, nutritious foods. What affects food security is policy, zoning, land use, and increasingly, climate change.

The food system in America-- how we produce, process, distribute, and consume food—is broken. Market researcher and bestselling author Paco Underhill sets out to solve these problems and show us where our eating and driving lives are headed in his newest book, How We Eat: The Brave New World of Food and Drink. Underhill takes an upbeat, hopeful, and characteristically witty approach to how we can change the way we consume.

How We Eat reveals the future of food in surprising ways, like how the city is getting country-fied with the rise of farmer’s markets and rooftop farms; how supermarkets are on their way out with their most valuable real estate, their parking lot, for growing their own food and hosting community events; and how marijuana farmers, who have been using artificial light to grow a crop for years, have developed a playbook so mainstream merchants and farmers across the world can grow food in an uncertain future.

You may watch the program here if you missed it virtually.

Community Partners: Wakeman Town Farm, Westport Farmers Market

Paco Underhill is the founder of Envirosell, Inc., a global research and consulting firm. His clients include more than a third of the Fortune 100 list, and he has worked on supermarkets, convenience store, food, beverage, and restaurant issues in fifty countries. He has written articles for or been profiled in The New York Times, The Wall Street JournalThe Washington PostThe New YorkerSmithsonian Magazine, and more.

If you'd like to continue the discussion, join Wakeman Town Farm on Tuesday, January 18.

Dinner Disrupted is a series created in partnership with libraries in Fairfield and New Haven County engaging patrons in collective discussions and actions focused on engaging residents to play a more active role in their food system. Together, we can reimagine our landscape and use the library as a test ground for reincorporating food into our landscape. Imagine a future where the public grounds are a food forests, adding biodiversity to the landscape, which ultimately helps to improve air quality, regenerate the soil, aids with water conservation, and increases public health and wellbeing. Food security is defined as the state of having reliable access to a sufficient quantity of affordable, nutritious foods. What affects food security is policy, zoning, land use, and increasingly, climate change.

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