In her book, WE NEED NEW STORIES: The Myths that Subvert Freedom, Nesrine Malik will examine six political myths used to deflect and discredit demands for social justice with Catherine Lewis.

Exploring how political myths function, she breaks down how they are employed to subvert calls for equality from historically disenfranchised groups. Interweaving reportage with an incendiary analysis of American history and politics, she offers a compelling account of how calls to preserve "free speech" are used against the vulnerable; how a fixation with "wokeness," "political correctness," and "cancel culture" is in fact an organized and well-funded campaign by elites; and how the fear of racial minorities and their “identity politics” obscures the biggest threat of all—white terrorism. What emerges is a radical framework for understanding the crises roiling American contemporary politics in this "Publishers Weekly most anticipated book of Spring 2021."

This is a virtual event, please register.

Purchase a copy of WE NEED NEW STORIES.

Nesrine Malik is an award-winning British-Sudanese columnist and features writer for the GuardianWE NEED NEW STORIES is her first book. She lives in London.

Catherine Lewis, LCSW, MS, is a member of the teaching faculty at Ackerman Institute for the Family and the Director of Ackerman's Foster Care and Adoption Project (FCAP). Catherine specializes in working with individuals and families impacted by interpersonal and systemic trauma. She maintains a small private practice in New York City and Westport, working with families, couples and children and is a member of TEAM Westport.

Read The Guardian's review. 

 

Towards a More Perfect Union: Confronting Racism

Own Voice Booklist

Stop Racial Injustice

As Confederate monuments come down in U.S. cities, America is once again grappling with its racist past. For Ty Seidule, a retired Brigadier General in the U.S. Army and Professor Emeritus of History at West Point, this issue is personal. Brought up to revere Robert E. Lee, Seidule once believed that the Confederates were romantic underdogs who lost the Civil War with honor. Seidule will discuss his new book, ROBERT E. LEE AND ME: A Southerner’s Reckoning with the Myth of the Lost Cause, with Maggie Mudd, former Westport Library trustee. Seidule describes how he confronted the racist legacy at the core of his identity and challenges the persistent myths of the Lost Cause.

If you missed this event, you can watch the recording here.

“Seidule openly confronts his own indifference to racism, and this absorbing book will be of value to anyone interested in how history informs our present.”—Library Journal, Starred Review

“A timely, powerful, compelling – and courageous – book. In Robert E. Lee and Me, Brigadier General Ty Seidule takes readers on a fascinating intellectual journey...This is a book of enormous importance and tremendous insight, a book that only a true southerner – and a true historian – could have written.”—General David Petraeus, US Army (Ret.), former Commander of the Surge in Iraq, US Central Command, and Coalition Forces in Afghanistan and former Director of the CIA.

Ty Seidule is Professor Emeritus of History at West Point where he taught for two decades. He served in the U.S. Army for thirty-six years, retiring as a brigadier general in 2020. He is the Chamberlain Fellow at Hamilton College as well as a New America Fellow. He has published numerous books, articles, and videos on military history including the award-winning West Point History of the Civil War. Ty graduated from Washington and Lee University and holds a PhD from the Ohio State University.

Maggie Mudd moved from New York to Westport 26 years ago to start married life and raise a family. She served 12 years as a Trustee of the Board of the Westport Library, which she credits with curing her trepidation about moving to a small town. She grew up in big cities around the world and had an international career, principally in banking; she also worked at the Commerce Department, the I.M.F., and the non-profit, Financial Services Volunteer Corps. As the daughter of a career diplomat, and with 2 career Army officers among her close relatives who served in sensitive spots, she naturally developed an amateur interest in political-military relations and international conflict prevention.

 

The American Civil War

Towards a More Perfect Union: Confronting Racism

American Government: The Thirteenth Amendment

 

This event has been cancelled. We apologize for any inconvenience.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Towards a More Perfect Union: Confronting Racism

African American History

Cinema of Diversity

Own Voices Booklist

 

Discuss Caste by Isabel Wilkerson, a WestportREADS selection, which examines the unspoken caste system that has shaped America and shows how our lives today are still defined by a hierarchy of human divisions.

Via Zoom conferencing. Contact Carolyn Karwoski, ckarwoski@westportlibrary.org to register.

PageTurners Book Club page

For copies of the book, phone 203.291.4821. New participants always welcome.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Westport Reads 2021: Towards a More Perfect Union

Equity, Diversity, & Inclusion

Stop Racial Injustice Guide

Resources for Book Clubs

 

"Race, poverty, inadequate legal assistance, and prosecutorial indifference to innocence conspired to create a textbook example of injustice. I can’t think of a case that more urgently dramatizes the need for reform than what has happened to Anthony Ray Hinton."
--Bryan Stevenson

Join acclaimed filmmaker Trey Ellis as he sits down with Anthony Ray Hinton for a riveting conversation about race, wrongful incarceration, and social justice.

Please note: This is a virtual event. REGISTER HERE

Anthony Ray Hinton walked out of the Jefferson County Jail in Birmingham, Alabama, a free man for the first time in 30 years at 9:30 a.m. on Friday, April 3, 2015.

“The sun does shine,” he said as he was embraced by family and friends.

Trey Ellis is an American Book Award Winning novelist, Emmy and Peabody-winning filmmaker, playwright and Professor of Screenwriting in the Graduate School of Film at Columbia University.  Most recently he was an Executive Producer, interviewer and co-field director for the HBO documentary True Justice: Bryan Stevenson's Fight For Equality, and Executive Producer and interviewer for King in the Wilderness, also for HBO.

Community Partner: United Nations Association of Southwest Connecticut

Stop Racial Injustice

Mass Incarceration

African American History

Equity, Diversity, Inclusion

Before Jackie Robinson broke Major League Baseball's color barrier in 1947, Black athletes played in the Negro Leagues--on teams coached by Black managers, cheered on by Black fans, and often run by Black owners. Join Andrea Williams when she discusses her new book, BASEBALL'S LEADING LADY with Ramin Ganeshram, executive director of the Westport Museum for History and Culture. This is the riveting true story of the woman at the center of the Black baseball world: Effa Manley, co-owner and business manager of the Newark Eagles.

This event will be appropriate for all ages.

Andrea Williams is an author and journalist who worked in marketing and development for the Negro Leagues Baseball Museum in her hometown of Kansas City, Missouri, before turning to writing full-time. She now lives and writes in Nashville, Tennessee.

If you missed the event, you can watch the recording here.

Community Partner: Westport Museum for History and Culture

Ramin Ganeshram is both an award-winning journalist and historian who is currently the Executive Director of the Westport Museum for History & Culture (formerly Westport Historical Society). Ganeshram’s area of study has been colonial-era African American history, particularly focused on enslaved African-Americans and mixed-race people and has been widely recognized for evolving the 131 year old Westport Museum toward an inclusive interpretation of local history as part of the larger American story by focusing on race, ethnicity and gender. In recognition for her work as curator of Westport Museum’s 2018-19 exhibit, Remembered: The History of African Americans in Westport, Ganeshram received the prestigious award for Leadership in the Museum Field from the New England Museum Association (NEMA). Remembered won awards of merit from the Connecticut League of History Associations (CLHO) and the coveted Award of Excellence from the American Association for State and Local History (AASLH). In 2019, Ganeshram was also awarded the Paul Cuffee Memorial Fellowship for the For the Study of Minorities in American Maritime History. A professional chef, Ganeshram is also  the author of 10 books focused on food, cooking and food history.

The Newark Public Library created a short video the Library produced about the Newark Eagles based on the team's business papers.

Trailblazing Women

Women's History Month

Pastime: Celebrating Baseball

Sports, Sports, Sports!

Read Jerry Craft's books, grab some dinner, and let's chat--did you catch any visual jokes? Ever feel like any of the characters? Was school ever like that for you?

Print copies and ebooks are available from the library.

Grades 6-8 March 1 Register here

Grades 4 - 5 March 8 Register here

Read Jerry Craft's books, grab some dinner, and let's chat--did you catch any visual jokes? Ever feel like any of the characters? Was school ever like that for you?

Print copies and ebooks are available from the library.

Grades 6-8 March 1 Register here

Grades 4 - 5 March 8 Register here

Meet the brilliant women who persisted across generations to change the Constitution. In her new book, WE THE WOMEN, author Julie C. Suk, tells the story of the ERA through the voices of the bold women lawmakers who created it. Despite significant gains, the achievements of gender equality have fallen short, especially for working mothers and women of color. Suk excavates the ERA’s past to guide its future, explaining how the ERA can address hot-button issues such as pregnancy discrimination, sexual harassment, and unequal pay.

After passage of the Nineteenth Amendment, revolutionary women demanded full equality beyond suffrage by proposing the Equal Rights Amendment. Congress took almost 50 years to adopt it in 1972 and the states took almost as long to ratify it. In January 2020, Virginia became the final state needed to ratify the amendment. Why did the ERA take so long? Is it too late to add it to the Constitution? And what could it do for women?

This is a virtual event, please register. 

Books can be ordered for pick up at the Westport Library. 

JULIE C. SUK is a frequent commentator in the media on legal issues affecting women, including The New York Times, The Washington Post, Vox, and CBS News. The House Julie SukJudiciary Committee cited Suk’s article, “An Equal Rights Amendment for the Twenty-First Century: Bringing Global Constitutionalism Home” in its report leading to the House’s historic vote in 2020 to remove the ERA ratification deadline. Suk is a professor of sociology, political science, and liberal studies at The Graduate Center of the City University of New York (CUNY), where she also serves as the academic dean overseeing the Graduate Center’s interdisciplinary master’s programs. Prior to joining The Graduate Center, Suk was a law professor for 13 years at Cardozo Law School in New York, and taught as a visiting professor at the law schools at Harvard, Columbia, University of Chicago, and UCLA. In Fall 2020, she will be a Visiting Professor at Yale Law School. She has lectured widely in the United States and Europe and has been a visiting fellow at the European University Institute in Florence and LUISS-Guido Carli in Rome. She has a J.D. from Yale Law School, where she studied on a Paul & Daisy Soros Fellowship for New Americans and a D.Phil. in Politics from Oxford University, where she held a Marshall Scholarship.

History of the Equal Rights Amendment

The Constitutional Amendment Process

Women's Health

Our Vote. Our Future: Hot Topics

 

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